Mecca Metro Line Station designed by GreenhilLi

Proposed station on Al Mashaaer Al Mugaddassah Metro Southern Line designed by Singaporean architects GreenhilLi

greenhilli_mecca_23

All images, graphics and information courtesy of GreenhilLi; © by GreenhilLi; See detailed credits at the end of the article

Singapore-based architectural practice, GreenhilLi was invited to be part of an international consortium to procure and develop a rail transit system for Mecca. This is their proposed design for one of the station types.

 

The challenge:

The Hajj pilgrimage to Mecca is one of the most significant events in the Muslim world to take place annually. It is a major undertaking for both pilgrims and organizers as over the 12-day event, Mecca and its surroundings are suddenly populated by millions of visiting pilgrims with accommodation and transportation needs presenting a daunting logistics challenge to the organizers and residents of Mecca.

The Ministry of Rural and Agricultural Affairs in Jeddah called for design build and operate tenders from international consortia to procure and deliver a rail transit system servicing the Hajj route. Invited by  Saudi contractor Al-Harbi Group and Bovis Lend Lease Singapore-based architectural practice GreenhilLi proposed a design for one of the station types to demonstrate the team’s understanding of the challenging brief.

A study of the potential passenger demand showed that the required system capacity would need trains over 300m long and corresponding platform lengths. It was clear that a conventional metro-style station circulation with a fare collection system, unpaid/paid demarcation areas and escalator/stair circulation means would not work in this context as it would slow down circulation too much. It was also clear that boarding and alighting passenger flows needed to be separated to maintain crowd control and organize circulation; therefore a side platform rather than island platform system was more practical. Further requirements for maintaining the existing road network to the sacred sites as well as minimizing impact on the terrain meant that the majority of the metro system had to be elevated directly above the road. The main challenge of the brief was the safe and efficient circulation of passengers at each destination; how to safely and efficiently enable passengers to alight, provide access to the sacred ground plane, cross the road and then to the boarding platform without any potential cross-flow in circulation.

greenhilli_mecca_16

The design:

GreenhilLi designed a series of 6 to 7 very wide and gentle step ramps distributed along the length of the station to provide access to the platforms from the ground level. An intermediate floor level was also introduced across the road and corresponding step ramps provided below the platform ramps. Several lifts distributed along the length of the station provided equitable access for the disabled and the elderly.

greenhilli_mecca_15

The circulation pattern is reflected in the double sinusoidal roof form, which peaks at each mouth of the ramps and lifts to reinforce way-finding. The rhythm of the circulation elements relating intrinsically to the geometry of the roof form acts as a strong visual cue to guide the pilgrims within the landscape back to the station. At the same time, the dominant horizontal undulation of the station roof maintains a harmony with the landscape, rather than compete with it. The wave roof profile is repeated on the opposite side, but slipped and alternating such that the circulation elements are diagonally opposite each other.

greenhilli_mecca_06a

Elevation showing double sinusoidal roof form and corresponding circulation on both sides
greenhilli_mecca_07
Exploded view :
-Roof
-Platform level: side platforms & ramps
-Intermediate level: foot bridges, ramps & services
-Ground level: road & viaduct supports
Circulation sequence:
greenhilli_mecca_02
1 Passengers arrive at alighting platform and proceed directly to ground via ramps
 
greenhilli_mecca_05
2 Passengers use foot bridges to cross the road via ramps
 
greenhilli_mecca_04
3 Passengers proceed from ground to boarding platform via ramps
 
greenhilli_mecca_03
4 Passengers depart from boarding platform
 
greenhilli_mecca_01
Aerial view over the 300m long station
 
greenhilli_mecca_14
Ramps to intermediate level foot bridges are located below ramps to platform from ground. These ramps fork to accommodate lifts between.
 
greenhilli_mecca_12
Skylights along the tracks filter daylight to the deepest part of the platform level and provide natural ventilation
 
greenhilli_mecca_10
The roof form peaks at the circulation location to emphasis this and thrusts forward to provide more shade
 
greenhilli_mecca_08
The undulating station roof maintains a harmony with the landscape

The brief generates a highly interesting design challenge which this design has provided a resoundingly response which fulfills the functionality with an architectural form that would have also served as a distinctive new representation for the Hajj and Mecca experience.

Credits:

Architect: GreenhilLi

Contractor: Al Harbi Group
Project Management: Bovis Lend Lease
Structural Consultant: Buro Happold
Rail and Station Operations: SMRT Corporation (Singapore)
Systemwide Signaling: Westinghouse

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s